Animals can help disperse seeds, but did you know that sometimes a seed-eater gets eaten by the predator, and that’s actually a good thing for the seeds in the gut of the seed-eater? Read more in our article: Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore

 

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Media Coverage of our article: The ecological significance of secondary seed dispersal by carnivores

 

Media articles about this paper:

Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore: New Paper from Boutin Lab. Wild49 Blog

Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore. University of Alberta.

Predator poop key to repopulating plant populations, University of Alberta researchers find. Edmonton Journal.

Research shows secondary seed dispersal by predator animals is important for recolonization of plants. Phys.org

Scat secrets: Edmonton study explores role of predator poop in spreading plant seeds. CBC

Hitching a ride with a predator. Science Daily

How predators help plants grow. CBC Radio

 

Other References to our Article:

We contributed an article to Wikipedia about diplochory.

Our article was also referenced in a media release about another publication: Tree-climbing goats disperse seeds by spitting, Ecological Society of America

 

Altmetrics:

Check out altmetrics for this article on the publisher’s website.

 

Find our paper here:

A. Hamalainen, K. Broadley, A. Droghini, J.A. Haines, C.T. Lamb, S. Boutin, S. Gilbert. 2017. The ecological significance of secondary seed dispersal by carnivores. Ecosphere 82(2):e01685. doi: 10.1002/ecs2.1685