See my full publication list.

 


Sexually selected infanticide by male red squirrels in advance of a mast year

SONY DSC

Check out the University of Alberta Faculty of Science press release about this paper.

You can read a blog post that I wrote on the Wild49 website: Male red squirrels kill other squirrels’ offspring to increase their chances of having kids.

You can also read my story in a Twitter thread.

 

Select media articles about this paper:

Red squirrels kill offspring of male rivals: study. Brampton Guardian

Red squirrel kills offspring of male rival, then mates with the female: Alberta study. Calgary Herald

Killer squirrels commit infanticide in times of plentiful food, study shows. Calgary Sun

Male red squirrels kill offspring of rivals, new University of Alberta study suggests. CBC

Male squirrels kill rivals’ offspring when food is bountiful: study. CTV Edmonton News

Killer squirrels commit infanticide in times of plentiful food, study shows. Edmonton Journal

Male squirrels kill offspring of rivals in years when food is plentiful, study shows. Folio

Red squirrels commit ‘sexually selected infanticide’ when food is abundant: Alberta research. Global News

Why red squirrels kill the offspring of their male rivals — no matter how cute they may be. Metro News Edmonton

These Adorable Squirrels Are Also Baby-Killing Cannibals. National Geographic

Red squirrels kill offspring of male rivals when food is abundant: study. National Observer

Study: Red squirrel kills offspring of male rival, then mates with the female. National Post

 

Radio and TV interviews about this paper:

CBC Edmonton, Radio Active, navigate to 0:11 in podcast to hear the interview.

Global News Radio 770 CHQR in Calgary, The Morning News with Gord Gillies, navigate to 42:10 in podcast to hear the interview.

CTV News at Five, navigate to 28:40 to see the interview.

CBC Calgary, News at 11, navigate to 14:01 to see the interview.

 


Fitness consequences of peak reproductive effort in a resource pulse system

Squirrel Photo Peak Paper
Female red squirrel, photo by Anni Hämäläinen

See the summary of our work on Wild49, by Anni Hämäläinen: Squirrel baby boomers are masters of timing.

 

Media articles about this paper:

Mothers master tricky timing to give babies a boost, squirrel study suggests. CBC

Baby boomer squirrels master tricky timing. University of Alberta

 

Altmetrics:

Check out the altmetrics for this article on the publisher’s website.

 

Find our paper here:

A. Hämäläinen, A.G. McAdam, B. Dantzer, J.E. Lane, J.A. Haines, M. Humphries, S. Boutin. 2017. Fitness consequences of peak reproductive effort in a resource pulse system. Scientific Reports 7: 9335. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-09724-x

 


The ecological significance of secondary seed dispersal by carnivores

diplo_infog_lamb

Animals can help disperse seeds, but did you know that sometimes a seed-eater gets eaten by the predator, and that’s actually a good thing for the seeds in the gut of the seed-eater? Read more in our article: Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore

 

Media articles about this paper:

Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore: New Paper from Boutin Lab. Wild49 Blog

Hitching a Ride with a Carnivore. University of Alberta.

Predator poop key to repopulating plant populations, University of Alberta researchers find. Edmonton Journal.

Research shows secondary seed dispersal by predator animals is important for recolonization of plants. Phys.org

Scat secrets: Edmonton study explores role of predator poop in spreading plant seeds. CBC

Hitching a ride with a predator. Science Daily

How predators help plants grow. CBC Radio

 

Other References to our Article:

We contributed an article to Wikipedia about diplochory.

Our article was also referenced in a media release about another publication: Tree-climbing goats disperse seeds by spitting, Ecological Society of America

 

Altmetrics:

Check out altmetrics for this article on the publisher’s website.

 

Find our paper here:

A. Hamalainen, K. Broadley, A. Droghini, J.A. Haines, C.T. Lamb, S. Boutin, S. Gilbert. 2017. The ecological significance of secondary seed dispersal by carnivores. Ecosphere 82(2):e01685. doi: 10.1002/ecs2.1685

 


Condition- and parasite-dependent expression of a male-like trait in a female bird

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Female red grouse sitting on her nest in heather, photo by Jessica A. Haines.

 

Media articles about this paper:

Fit females have strong male-like traits, reveals study. Environmental News Network

 

Altmetrics:

Check out altmetrics for this article on the publisher’s website.

 

Find our paper here:

J. Martinez-Padilla, P. Vergara, L. Pérez-Rodríguez, F. Mougeot, F. Casas, S.C. Ludwig, J.A. Haines, M. Zeineddine, S.M. Redpath. 2011. Condition- and parasite-dependent expression of a male-like trait in a female bird. Biology Letters. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2010.0991